What Makes a Baby?

baby

What Makes a Baby?

Oh, the million-dollar question that can give adults everywhere anxiety attacks – “where do babies come from?” Many picture books on the subject of reproduction talk about sex, which is a very important topic to discuss with children, but which isn’t always a factor in the baby-making process. Babies are the result of a collision between sperm and egg, and this miraculous collision can occur with or without sexual intercourse between a male and a female. Some children are born to a biological mother and father with the help of IVF, while other babies are conceived to same-sex families through donor eggs or sperm, IVF and/or or surrogates. Just as families come in a variety of shapes, sizes and forms, babies are created in many different ways, and each way is special.

Brought to you by the same team behind the inclusive, sex-positive sex-ed book Sex is a Funny WordWhat Makes a Baby is “a book for every kind of FAMILY and every kind of KID”. It’s a great starting point for discussions on reproduction, sex, and childbirth, providing the basic framework of information, and allowing caregivers to customise their discussions to suit their own experiences. Just as in Sex is a Funny Word, the characters in What Makes a Babycome in a variety of candy colours, and are often portrayed externally without conventional gender identifiers, allowing readers to insert themselves into the images.

This is a particularly helpful picture book for same-sex families, as it gives their conception stories the same weight, worth and importance as those of other families, and doesn’t make their stories feel like exceptions to the any rule, uncommon, or unusual. Conception is the same process, no matter how the egg and sperm end up meeting, or how they are introduced.

What Makes a Baby? is a fantastic starting point for discussions of conception and birth, and is a worthwhile addition to any collection.

Freckleface Strawberry, or, Finding Diversity in Unusual Places

Freckleface Strawberry, or, Finding Diversity in Unusual Places

Finding diversity in early readers, particularly when it comes to popular, commercially-successful series, can unfortunately be a real struggle for many teachers, librarians and caregivers. Books featuring trains, dinosaurs, aliens, superheroes and animals are a dime a dozen, but finding stories that reflect the diversity of our communities can be challenging. I discovered a great […]

2017 LGBTQ YA Releases

2017 LGBTQ YA Releases

I’ll be honest – this month’s romance theme is a tough one for me. I don’t typically read a lot of YA or MG, and there isn’t usually that much romance in picture books. However – when I’m not singing songs with toddlers, I’m one of the co-chairs of the BC Library Association’s LGBTQ Interest Group. […]

Guest Post: A Review of Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit by Leah CL

Guest Post: A Review of Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit by Leah CL

 Leah CL’s mother used to say the world could end around her while she was reading and she wouldn’t even notice. She loves children’s lit, particularly middle grade fiction, and is sure she’ll get around to writing her own…one of these days. Leah has a degree in journalism and a degree in music, so logically […]

Review: Spirits Abroad by Zen Cho

Review: Spirits Abroad by Zen Cho

… Embarrassing relatives became less of a problem after Vivian left Malaysia. In the modern Western country where she lived, the public toilets were clean, the newspapers were allowed to be as rude to the government as they liked, and nobody believed in magic except people in whom nobody believed. — The First Witch of […]

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Haruka and Michiru – My First Lesbians

Yash’s great post on same-sex relationships in school stories got me thinking about my own experiences with diverse literature, especially as a young person. I started to wonder: when did I first encounter a fictional same-sex couple? I’m one of the older members of The Book Wars team, and suffice it to say, children’s literature […]