Webcomic Loves: On “Rock And Riot” And “Flowerpot”

Hm, it seems like all of my good webcomic recommendations come from Lindsay/Me On Books*–including, but not limited to, the two webcomics I’d like to talk about today? Basically, if you aren’t already following her blog and/or her Twitter, you’re settling for second-hand recommendations from me.

*ahem* Speaking of recommendations, I better get started:

Rock And Riot

I’ve been wanting to talk about this webcomic for a while, but either I was behind or it was the completely wrong theme for me to introduce this story, so I’m glad everything aligned perfectly this month!

Rock and Riot is a webcomic that is set in the 1950’s and follows teenaged members from two opposing gangs, their lives, their romances, and their histories. It’s easy to follow, adorable, and funny, and oh DID I MENTION ADORABLE BECAUSE LOOK IT JUST SLAYS ME WITH HOW CUTE:

SOURCE: http://rockandriotcomic.com/post/131041804923

If there is a flaw, it is that racism is not really addressed in the comic–once, maybe, that I’ve noticed–which is not so odd for Flowerpot, but feels odd for this one since it’s the ’50s? I feel?

The comic chooses, instead, to focus on discrimination against queer people and this is one of its strengths: it definitely has many diverse romances and does not exclude people on the aromantic and asexual spectrum.

And! And! The first chapter of the webcomic has also been animated! BEHOLD! THE CUTEST CUTIES EVER!

But, okay, okay, say you want diverse romances but only as a subplot. Say you want something slow, but comparably adorable. Well, then …

Flowerpot

SOURCE: http://flowerpot-comic.tumblr.com/post/136451132675/flowerpot-title-page-read-flowerpot-on-tapastic

Flowerpot is your best option:

“A story about a boy who grows dandelions from his head because of a mysterious disease, and all the problems that entails.”

Ten years ago, Ben was the first person to be infected by a strange disease that causes flowers to grow from his body every spring and summer. In a world where flowers have become frightening, Ben has come to accept that most people will want to keep their distance from his dandelions. However, when an enthusiastic photographer arrives out of the blue and asks Ben to be a part of his project, Ben begins to discover what being a “flowerpot” really means. — [X]

This is kind of a non-zombie version of the TV show In The Flesh. Except way more diverse, and way, way, happier. At least, for now.

And while we are only just witnessing the beginnings of a romance (or maybe more than one romance), the author has made it clear that canon queer couple/s is/are the endgame, so all we have to do is lie back and enjoy the ride.

SOURCE: http://flowerpot-comic.tumblr.com/post/136451429260/flowerpot-chapter-1-page-8-start-next

And it is a very pretty ride, isn’t it? The art is gorgeous, the characters are complex, flawed, and wonderful, and even though we know quite a bit about this world, there’s still tons we don’t know and so we just can’t stop ourselves from scrolling down. Definitely recommended!

So, depending on what kind of story/setting/romance you’re in the mood for, you have two sweet options.

Happy Friday, unicorns.

Jazz in Love by Neesha Meminger

Jazz in Love by Neesha Meminger

Jasbir, a.k.a. Jazz, has always been a stellar student and an obedient, albeit wise-cracking, daughter. Everything has gone along just fine — she has good friends in the “genius” program she’s been in since kindergarten, her teachers and her principal adore her, and her parents dote on her. But now, in her junior year of […]

2017 LGBTQ YA Releases

2017 LGBTQ YA Releases

I’ll be honest – this month’s romance theme is a tough one for me. I don’t typically read a lot of YA or MG, and there isn’t usually that much romance in picture books. However – when I’m not singing songs with toddlers, I’m one of the co-chairs of the BC Library Association’s LGBTQ Interest Group. […]

Review: Tell Me Again How a Crush Should Feel

Review: Tell Me Again How a Crush Should Feel

“Look at how pretty you are!” Mum exclaims. “You should straighten your hair all the time!” Well, I guess that’s one thing I can straighten about myself. (p. 63) Leila Azadi has always managed to avoid crushing on any of her classmates. No one knows she likes girls, not her loving and traditional Iranian parents, […]

Frederica: or, a Regency romance in which everyone is (accidentally) queer – Part 3

Frederica: or, a Regency romance in which everyone is (accidentally) queer – Part 3

Part 1 – Frederica herself Part 2 – Alverstoke and his foils So far Georgette Heyer’s Frederica has revealed a wonderful, albeit unintentional, abundance of asexual and aromantic characters. Hold on to your hats, my dears, there’s more. Chloe Dauntry, for one. Chloe is nearly seventeen, daughter of Alverstoke’s deceased brother, and sister to Endymion, Alverstoke’s […]

Frederica: or, a Regency romance in which everybody is (accidentally) queer – Part 2

Frederica: or, a Regency romance in which everybody is (accidentally) queer – Part 2

Last week I talked about Frederica Merrivale, an ace-aro woman who is, at least nominally, the protagonist of the book named after her. (I say nominally because, as so often happens in romances, at least, those written by Georgette Heyer, the narrative focus slips back and forth between the female lead and the male lead, […]

Frederica: or, a Regency romance in which everybody is (accidentally) queer – Part 1

Frederica: or, a Regency romance in which everybody is (accidentally) queer – Part 1

A few weeks ago, desperately in need of a comfort (re)read, I picked up Frederica by Georgette Heyer. I soon realized that this was not the book I remembered. Regency romances – older Regency romances, at any rate – are desperately straight: no matter how dear her best friend is or how clever and ravishingly […]

Review: Spirits Abroad by Zen Cho

Review: Spirits Abroad by Zen Cho

… Embarrassing relatives became less of a problem after Vivian left Malaysia. In the modern Western country where she lived, the public toilets were clean, the newspapers were allowed to be as rude to the government as they liked, and nobody believed in magic except people in whom nobody believed. — The First Witch of […]